What Alan Greenspan Has Learned Since 2008

Not long after Alan Greenspan stepped down as Federal Reserve chairman in 2006, global financial markets began to unravel. The collapse of a few financial institutions, the near-collapse of many others, a massive bailout by multiple governments, and the worst economic downturn in three-quarters of a century ensued. Lots of people blamed Greenspan for some or all of this, and the man himself famously allowed, in a Congressional hearing in October 2008, that he had “found a flaw” in his model of how the world works.

Then, somewhat remarkably for a guy who had recently turned 80, he actually set to work trying to figure out what he’d gotten wrong. “It seems sort of silly,” he says now, “but I’ve learned more in the last three or four years than the previous ten.” In the fall he came out with a book setting out his new and improved worldview, The Map and the Territory: Risk, Human Nature, and the Future of Forecasting. But even that’s not the end of it. “I guess they shut it down in June,” he says, estimating when the book went to the printer. “I’ve come a long way since then.”

http://blogs.hbr.org/2014/01/what-alan-greenspan-has-learned-since-2008/

Related Posts

  • 56
    The Federal Reserve holds its last policy meeting of the year on Tuesday and Wednesday, resulting in plenty of material to be scoured for clues about when interest rates will start inching up. The central bank’s policy committee releases its statement and new economic projections at 2 p.m. Wednesday, followed…
    Tags: financial, economic, reserve, fed, federal, usa
  • 56
    The FOMC meeting is the week's highlight even though policy outcome seems a foregone conclusion. It will continue with the tapering course that Bernanke put on the Fed on before he left. However, there are more moving parts than usual, and it is worth reviewing. Essentially, there are four elements of…
    Tags: fed, usa
  • 56
    October 22, 2014 Santiago, Chile The US government’s debt is getting close to reaching another round number—$18 trillion. It currently stands at more than $17.9 trillion. But what does that really mean? It’s such an abstract number that it’s hard to imagine it. Can you genuinely understand it beyond just…
    Tags: debt, people, years, usa
  • 50
    The following are the expectations for the minutes of the January FOMC meeting by the economists at Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Citibank, Morgan Stanley, Barclays Capital, and other leading banks. http://www.efxnews.com/
    Tags: usa, fed
  • 50
    Picking the best debt-ceiling explainer is a very subjective task. Do you like charts? Then you'll probably like to have the debt ceiling explained in one chart.  Do you like movies? This one will explain the debt ceiling in 90 seconds.  Do you like cheese from Denmark? Then you will probably like…
    Tags: debt, debt-ceiling